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Flux Capacitor Transmorgifier

Main.FluxCapacitorTransmorgifier History

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24 May 2014 at 11:02 PM by 203.97.97.117 -
Added lines 2-5:

(See also: [[\Main/Arduino\|New Arduino powered version 3 transmorgifier]])

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13 December 2012 at 10:56 AM by 125.239.118.92 -
Changed line 45 from:
Here's how to rip apart a hair dryer so you can tern it into something else. They're designed to run off 12 volts , but the motor still works fine with a 9 volt battery, just slower and less powerful. Having it underpowered makes it less dangerous for little fingers.
to:
Here's how to rip apart a hair dryer so you can turn it into something else. They're designed to run off 12 volts , but the motor still works fine with a 9 volt battery, just slower and less powerful. Having it underpowered makes it less dangerous for little fingers.
03 October 2012 at 09:47 PM by Paul -
Changed lines 13-14 from:
There's a 3 position switch (from another old hair drier) which is either; off, up = Large LED's on plus fan, or down = flashing LEDs on.
to:
There's a 3 position switch (from another old hair dryer) which is either; off, up = Large LED's on plus fan, or down = flashing LEDs on.
Changed lines 19-20 from:
The second one is made from a $1 hair drier (bought off Trade Me). I ripped out the heating element and moved the fan to the front of the casing. Then added LED's; some small 3mm ones, some 5mm flashing ones, a bright orange LED in behind the fan. Again it uses a single 9 volt LED to power it.
to:
The second one is made from a $1 hair dryer (bought off Trade Me). I ripped out the heating element and moved the fan to the front of the casing. Then added LED's; some small 3mm ones, some 5mm flashing ones, a bright orange LED in behind the fan. Again it uses a single 9 volt LED to power it.
Changed lines 43-45 from:
!!! How to convert a hair drier to a battery powered fan

Here's how to rip apart a hair drier so you can tern it into something else. They're designed to run off 12 volts , but the motor still works fine with a 9 volt battery, just slower and less powerful. Having it underpowered makes it less dangerous for little fingers.
to:
!!! How to convert a hair dryer to a battery powered fan

Here's how to rip apart a hair dryer so you can tern it into something else. They're designed to run off 12 volts , but the motor still works fine with a 9 volt battery, just slower and less powerful. Having it underpowered makes it less dangerous for little fingers.
03 October 2012 at 09:17 PM by Paul -
Changed line 45 from:
Here's how to rip apart a hair drier so you can tern it into something else. They're designed to run off 12/24 volts , but the motor still works fine with a 9 volt battery, just slower and less powerful. Having it underpowered makes it less dangerous for little fingers.
to:
Here's how to rip apart a hair drier so you can tern it into something else. They're designed to run off 12 volts , but the motor still works fine with a 9 volt battery, just slower and less powerful. Having it underpowered makes it less dangerous for little fingers.
03 October 2012 at 09:07 PM by Paul -
Changed lines 39-49 from:
Cheers, [[http://www.kennett.co.nz/aboutus/contact.html?to=Paul&subject=Flux_capacitor_transmorgifier|Paul]]
to:
Cheers, [[http://www.kennett.co.nz/aboutus/contact.html?to=Paul&subject=Flux_capacitor_transmorgifier|Paul]]

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!!! How to convert a hair drier to a battery powered fan

Here's how to rip apart a hair drier so you can tern it into something else. They're designed to run off 12/24 volts , but the motor still works fine with a 9 volt battery, just slower and less powerful. Having it underpowered makes it less dangerous for little fingers.

<object width="640" height="480"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/1F9fvqhZxGA?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/1F9fvqhZxGA?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="480"></embed></object>\\
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F9fvqhZxGA
02 October 2012 at 11:28 PM by Paul -
Changed lines 3-6 from:
!! Mark 1

The first one was made from the shell of an old battery drill, plus a computer CPU fan and some flashing LEDs and a 9 volt battery.
to:
!! Mark 1 - for Adam

The first one was made from the shell of an old battery drill, plus a computer CPU fan glued on the front and some flashing LEDs and a 9 volt battery.
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!! Mark 2
to:
This took about 2 hours to build with Adam helping sometimes.

!! Mark 2 - for Ben
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When the fan runs it is spinning such that the sharp leading edge of the fan blades is on the inside of the casing - so if you stick your fingers into the fan blades (which everyone wants to do) your fingers are pushed "out" of the fan. Plus it's a 12 volt fan being driven by a 9 volt battery so it has so little grunt that it's easy to just stop the fan blades spinning with your finger.

All up this version took about 2 hours to build.

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All in all this has worked so well I'm keen to build up some more to see what else I can do to make them cool and still easy/quick to build.

Cheers, [[http://www.kennett.co.nz/aboutus/contact.html?to=Paul&subject=Flux_capacitor_transmorgifier|Paul]]
02 October 2012 at 11:17 PM by Paul -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
Smaller 5mm flashing LEDs
to:
Smaller 5mm flashing LEDs. Adam helped drill the holes.
Changed lines 17-18 from:
The second one is made from a $1 hair drier (bought off Trade Me). I ripped out the heating element and moved the fan to the front of the casing. Then added LED's; some small 3mm ones, some 5mm flashing ones, a bright orange LED in behind the fan, plus a yellow LED inside a plastic tube stuck on the out side. Again it uses a single 9 volt LED to power it.
to:
The second one is made from a $1 hair drier (bought off Trade Me). I ripped out the heating element and moved the fan to the front of the casing. Then added LED's; some small 3mm ones, some 5mm flashing ones, a bright orange LED in behind the fan. Again it uses a single 9 volt LED to power it.

Michelle said it need a bit more "steam punk" so I added a yellow LED inside a plastic tube stuck on the out side. And there's a piece of video drum head stuck on the back for looks.
Added lines 26-28:

The three position switch allows it to have two different on modes; switching two different strings of LED's with the fan.
02 October 2012 at 11:11 PM by Paul -
Added lines 1-23:
I've made a couple of "flux capacitor transmorgifiers" for my 5 year old son and his friend.

!! Mark 1

The first one was made from the shell of an old battery drill, plus a computer CPU fan and some flashing LEDs and a 9 volt battery.

Attach:mark1-left-side.jpg
Large 10mm LEDs

Attach:mark1-right-side.jpg
Smaller 5mm flashing LEDs

There's a 3 position switch (from another old hair drier) which is either; off, up = Large LED's on plus fan, or down = flashing LEDs on.

!! Mark 2

The second one is made from a $1 hair drier (bought off Trade Me). I ripped out the heating element and moved the fan to the front of the casing. Then added LED's; some small 3mm ones, some 5mm flashing ones, a bright orange LED in behind the fan, plus a yellow LED inside a plastic tube stuck on the out side. Again it uses a single 9 volt LED to power it.

Attach:mark2-right-side.jpg

Attach:mark2-front.jpg

Attach:mark2-left-side.jpg


Page last modified on 24 May 2014 at 11:02 PM